Extractive Resources

 

There are 702 items related to Extractive Resources. Items are listed by date added.

 

International Relations Theories: Energy, Minerals and Conflict

International Relations Theories: Energy, Minerals and Conflict

Source: POLINARES, 2010

Author(s): Roland Dannreuther

Topics: Conflict Causes, Extractive Resources

Added: 21/05/2017

 

IR theories seek to identify key regularities and patterns of interaction in the realm of international politics and to provide parsimonious models to explain the nature and underlying structures of that interaction. These theories generally have, whether implicitly or explicitly, a normative dimension – they say something about how international...

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Regulation (EU) 2017/821 of the European Parliament & the Council of 17 May 2017 Laying Down Supply Chain Due Diligence Obligations for Union Importers of Tin, Tantalum & Tungsten, Their Ores, and Gold Originating from Conflict-Affected & High-Risk Areas

Regulation (EU) 2017/821 of the European Parliament & the Council of 17 May 2017 Laying Down Supply Chain Due Diligence Obligations for Union Importers of Tin, Tantalum & Tungsten, Their Ores, and Gold Originating from Conflict-Affected & High-Risk Areas

Source: European Union, 2017

Topics: Extractive Resources, Governance

Added: 21/05/2017

 

Regulation (EU) 2017/821 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 May 2017 laying down supply chain due diligence obligations for Union importers of tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold originating from conflict-affected and high-risk areas .

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Jade and the Generals [Video]

Jade and the Generals [Video]

Source: Global Witness, 2017

Countries: Myanmar

Topics: Extractive Resources, Governance, Livelihoods

Added: 19/05/2017

 

As Myanmar gears up for landmark national peace talks this new Global Witness film reveals how the country’s massive jade business is helping to drive deadly armed conflict. What’s more, the multi-billion dollar trade is a threat to the peace efforts Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has made her government’s...

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Do Natural Resources Influence Who Comes to Power, and How?

Do Natural Resources Influence Who Comes to Power, and How?

Source: The Journal of Politics, 2017

Author(s): Maria Carreri and Oeindrilla Dube

Countries: Colombia

Topics: Extractive Resources, Governance

Added: 07/05/2017

 

Do natural resources impair institutional outcomes? Existing work studies how natural resources influence the behavior of leaders in power. We study how they influence leaders’ rise to power. Our analysis focuses on oil price shocks and local democracy in Colombia, a country mired in civil conflict. We find that when...

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Financing Rebellion: Using Piracy to Explain and Predict Conflict Intensity in Africa and Southeast Asia

Financing Rebellion: Using Piracy to Explain and Predict Conflict Intensity in Africa and Southeast Asia

Source: Journal of Peace Research, 2017

Author(s): Ursula Daxecker and Brandon C. Prins

Countries: Nigeria

Topics: Conflict Causes, Extractive Resources

Added: 07/05/2017

 

A prominent explanation of the resource-conflict relationship suggests that natural resources finance rebellion by permitting rebel leaders the opportunity to purchase weapons, fighters, and local support. The bunkering of oil in the Niger Delta by quasi-criminal syndicates is an example of how the black-market selling of stolen oil may help...

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“Oil above Water”: Economic Interdependence and Third-party Intervention

“Oil above Water”: Economic Interdependence and Third-party Intervention

Source: Journal of Conflict Resolution, 2015

Author(s): Vincenzo Bove, Kristian Skrede Gleditsch, and Petros G. Sekeris

Topics: Conflict Prevention, Extractive Resources

Added: 07/05/2017

 

We explore economic incentives for third parties to intervene in ongoing internal wars. We develop a three-party model of the decision to intervene in conflict that highlights the role of the economic benefits accruing from the intervention and the potential costs. We present novel empirical results on the role of...

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Political Exclusion, Oil, and Ethnic Armed Conflict

Political Exclusion, Oil, and Ethnic Armed Conflict

Source: Journal of Conflict Resolution, 2016

Author(s): Victor Asal, Michael Findley, James A. Piazza, and James Igoe Walsh

Topics: Conflict Causes, Extractive Resources

Added: 07/05/2017

 

Why do members of some ethnic groups rebel against the state? One approach holds that groups subject to exclusion from national politics engage in armed conflict. We theorize that the presence of resource wealth moderates the effect of political exclusion. Ethnic groups subject to exclusion whose settlement area includes oil...

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Golden Opportunity, or a New Twist on the Resource-Conflict Relationship: Links Between the Drug Trade and Illegal Gold Mining in Colombia

Golden Opportunity, or a New Twist on the Resource-Conflict Relationship: Links Between the Drug Trade and Illegal Gold Mining in Colombia

Source: World Development, 2016

Author(s): Angelika Rettberg and Juan Felipe Ortiz-Riomalo

Countries: Colombia

Topics: Conflict Causes, Extractive Resources, Livelihoods, Renewable Resources

Added: 07/05/2017

 

Resource wars face greater difficulties to end conflict, as well as greater probabilities of relapse. In part, this is due to the persistence of resource-fueled criminal networks developed under the auspices of armed conflict. In this paper we focus on the Colombian armed conflict, one of the longest-lasting conflicts in...

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Rethinking the Conflict "Resource Curse": How Oil Wealth Prevents Center-Seeking Civil Wars

Rethinking the Conflict "Resource Curse": How Oil Wealth Prevents Center-Seeking Civil Wars

Source: University of Rochester, 2016

Author(s): Jack Paine

Topics: Conflict Causes, Extractive Resources, Governance

Added: 07/05/2017

 

A broad literature on how oil wealth affects civil war onset argues that oil production engenders violent contests to capture a valuable prize from vulnerable governments. By contrast, research linking oil wealth to durable authoritarian regimes argues that oil-rich governments deter societal challenges by strategically allocating enormous revenues to enhance...

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Sudan's Deep State: How Insiders Violently Privatized Sudan's Wealth, and How to Respond

Sudan's Deep State: How Insiders Violently Privatized Sudan's Wealth, and How to Respond

Source: Enough Project, 2017

Countries: Sudan

Topics: Conflict Causes, Extractive Resources, Governance, Livelihoods

Added: 01/05/2017

 

Sudan’s government is a violent kleptocracy, a system of misrule characterized by state capture and co-opted institutions, where a small ruling group maintains power indefinitely through various forms of corruption and violence. Throughout his reign, President Omar al-Bashir has overseen the entrenchment of systemic looting, widespread impunity, political repression, and...

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